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1
Content available Muzea : nauka, edukacja, popularyzacja
EN
The purpose of this article is to outline some issues discussed during the conference organized by JuraPark Solec Kujawski as part of the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of its existence. This text is not a report on the agenda of the conference, but is intended to include the content presented in a wider context of the changes in Polish museology in the last decade. These considerations will include such aspects as the attempt to define a contemporary museum, the research activity of these institutions and museum education, and the promotion of knowledge.
EN
Sparse fish microremains have been found in marine limestones from the Middle Devonian (Givetian) Skały Formation (Sitka Coral-Crinoid Limestone Member and Sierżawy Member), Świętomarz–Śniadka section, Bodzentyn Syncline, Łysogóry Region, northern Holy Cross Mountains, associated with conodonts of the hemiansatus to ansatus zones. Thelodont scales referred here to Australolepis sp. cf. A. seddoni come from near Śniadka village, from samples dated as hemiansatus to rhenanus/varcus zones. This increases the known range for the genus from its original find in Western Australia. The presence of a thelodont in the late Middle Devonian in Poland extends the known distribution of turiniids around the peri-Gondwana shorelines of Palaeotethys.
EN
Palaeontological geotourism could be one of many forms of propagating geological values of a country. It can meet the expectations of many tourists. For this broad category of people, paleontological tourism can instill curiosity about the extinct world, offering them places where they can feel like explorers, visiting these sites with a hammer and a chisel. Many of them will cherish the memories of adventures made during the search in the future, and some will find a new passion. Similar practices are used in Germany, for example, in Solnhofen or Holzmaden, where fossil exploration is available for a small fee. In most regions of Poland, you can find numerous places with fossils that anyone can search for. The greatest number of such sites can be found in the south of Poland, in the uplands and mountains, but also at the seaside, where the practice of palaeontological geotourism is possible. In the Holy Cross Mountains, the Sudetes, or in the Silesian-Cracow region, there are places where one finds fossils of plants or animals, including trace fossils. The only effort required in addition to the search for fossils is to develop guidelines and prepare guides for amateurs that quest for the lost world.
PL
Geoturystyka paleontologiczna może być jedną z form propagowania walorów geologicznych kraju. Może spełnić oczekiwania wielu turystów. Chodzi o szeroką grupę ludzi, których można zainteresować wymarłym światem, umożliwiając im zwiedzanie miejsc, gdzie mogą poczuć się jak odkrywcy, odwiedzając je z młotkiem i dłutem. Wielu z nich będzie w przyszłości pielęgnować wspomnienia o przygodach w trakcie poszukiwań, a część z nich znajdzie swoją pasję. Podobne praktyki stosuje się np. w Niemczech – w Solnhofen czy Holzmaden, gdzie za drobną opłatą można poszukiwać skamieniałości. W większości regionów Polski można znaleźć liczne miejsca ze skamieniałościami, których poszukiwać może każdy. Najwięcej takich stanowisk spotkamy na południu Polski, w strefach wyżyn i gór, ale i nad morzem uprawianie paleontologicznej geoturystyki jest możliwe. W Górach Świętokrzyskich, Sudetach czy rejonie śląsko-krakowskim są miejsca, w których znajdziemy skamieniałości roślin lub zwierząt, a także same skamieniałości śladowe. Wymaga to jedynie wysiłku opracowania wskazówek i przewodników dla amatorów poszukiwań zaginionego świata.
EN
At its maximum development in the type area on the Devon coast, the Upper Greensand Formation comprises up to 55 m of sandstones and calcarenites with laterally and stratigraphically variable amounts of carbonate cement, glauconite and chert that were deposited in fully marine, shallow-water environments. The formation is divided into three members, in ascending order the Foxmould, Whitecliff Chert and Bindon Sandstone, each of which is bounded by a prominent erosion surface that can be recognised throughout the western part of the Wessex Basin. The full thickness of the formation, up to 60 m, was formerly well exposed in cliffs in the Isle of Purbeck in the steeply dipping limb of the Purbeck Monocline. The upper part of the succession is highly condensed in comparison with the Devon succession and exhibits lateral variations over distances of hundreds of metres that are probably related to penecontemporaneous fault movements. Much of the fauna is not age-diagnostic with the result that the ages of parts of the succession are still poorly known. However, the Isle of Purbeck sections contain diverse ammonite faunas at a few stratigraphically well-defined levels that enable the succession to be correlated with that of east Devon and west Dorset.
EN
Here we briefly report the discovery of new, exceptionally well-preserved Late Jurassic (Tithonian) fossils from Owadow- Brzezinki quarry - one of the most important palaeontological sites in Poland. These finds which comprise organisms living originally in different environments indicate that the Owadow-Brzezinki site represents a link - most probably in a form of open marine passages - betweeen distinct palaeobiogeographical provinces. This creates an unprecedented opportunity for better recognition of the regional palaeobiogeography of adjacent European areas during the Late Jurassic.
6
Content available In his own words
EN
Bill Cobban in conversation with Kirk Johnson and Dave Baysinger, 19 February, 2010.
7
Content available remote Jacques Thierry (1941–2014)
EN
A diverse microvertebrate fauna is described from the Virgin Hills and Napier formations, Bugle Gap Limestone Canning Basin, Western Australia. Measured sections at Horse Spring and Casey Falls (Virgin Hills Formation) and South Oscar Range (Napier Formation) comprise proximal to distal slope carbonates ranging in age from the Late Devonian Frasnian to middle Famennian. A total of 18 chondrichthyan taxa are identified based on teeth, including the first record of Thrinacodus tranquillus, Cladoides wildungensis, Protacrodus serra and Lissodus lusavorichi from the Canning Basin. A new species, Diademodus dominicus sp. nov. is also described and provides the first record of this genus outside of Laurussia. In addition, the upper range of Australolepis seddoni has been extended to Late Devonian conodont Zone 11, making it the youngest known occurrence for this species. The Virgin Hills and Napier formations microvertebrate faunas show close affinities to faunas recovered from other areas of Gondwana, including eastern Australia, Iran, Morocco and South China, which is consistent with known conodont and trilobite faunas of the same age.
EN
Palaeontological fieldwork (2012‒14) in the Sadowa Góra quarry carried out under the auspices of the University of Silesia, within the framework of a research project supported by the National Science Centre, helped to document the taxonomic diversity of Middle Triassic marine vertebrates from the Cracow-Silesia region. Accumulations of fossil bones are correlated with storm deposition and are time-averaged.
EN
Seven species of the acanthoceratoidean genera Forbesiceras Kossmat, 1897, Mantelliceras Hyatt, 1903, Acanthoceras Neumayr, 1875 and Cunningtoniceras Collignon, 1937 are described and illustrated from the upper (i.e., Cenomanian) part of the Aitamir Formation of the Koppeh Dagh, northeast Iran. The mantelliceratines were collected from Lower Cenomanian silty shales while the rest of the fauna stems from lower Middle Cenomanian glauconitic sandstones in the upper part of the formation. The ammonite association allows recognition of the lower Lower Cenomanian Mantelliceras mantelli and the lower Middle Cenomanian Acanthoceras rhotomagense zones. The upper Lower Cenomanian M. dixoni Zone is not proven by its index but is most likely represented by a unit of fossil-poor shales intercalated between the two above-mentioned zones. The lowermost Middle Cenomanian Cunningtoniceras inerme Zone, however, is potentially at least partly missing due to a major sea-level fall and lowstand in the latest Early to earliest Middle Cenomanian. A preliminary sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the successions suggests the presence of Lower Cenomanian sequence boundaries Sb Ce 1-3. The Aitamir Formation is truncated along a major regional unconformity at the base of the overlying Abderaz Formation (Turonian.Coniacian). The Upper Cenomanian and most likely also (parts of) the Lower Turonian are missing. This major unconformity has a tectonic origin as it deviates from the eustatic sea-level trend which was very high at this time. Furthermore, contemporaneous tectonic unconformities are also known from Central Iran and may have their origins in rotational movements of the Central-East Iranian Microcontinent.
EN
The paper presents new data on origin of parallel orientation of modern assemblages of bone remains in dry, terrestrial environment, unaffected by any influence of hydraulic processes. The studies were carried out in the gallery no. 6 of ancient underground millstone quarry situated in forests near the Potok Senderki village, Central Roztocze Upland. The studied material included animal bone remains found in dry gallery, presently inhabited by red foxes (Vulpes vulpes L.). Azimuths of long bone axes as well as strike azimuths o vertical adit walls which confine occurrence of bone clusters, were measured using geological compass. The obtained results make it possible to conclude that linear parallel orientation of bone remains may occur in a dry, terrestrial environment. Such orientation of clusters is formed mainly due to repetitive movement of carnivores along vertical walls of the adit whereas no influence of hydraulic processes is needed here. The presence of a distinct, preferred orientation of the bones requires interaction of two specific factors: the place has to be inhabited by carnivorous animals for a long time (at least for a few months) and the corridor, along which animals move, has to be bounded by steep to vertical walls. Caves are particularly predisposed type of sites, where the occurrence of linear bone orientation may be expected. The studies were dealing with effects of actualistic processes but the described situation and the obtained conclusions may be valid in the case of fossil bone assemblages, for example those of the Pleistocene age.
EN
Artificial neural networks (ANNs), the computer software or systems that are able to "learn" on the basis of previously collected input data sets are proposed here as a new useful tool in paleontological modeling. Initially ANNs were designed to imitate the structure and function of natural neural systems such as the human brain. They are commonly used in many natural researches such as physics, geophysics, chemistry, biology, applied ecology etc. Special emphasis is put on the Kohonen self-organizing mapping algorithm, used in unsupervised networks for ordination purposes. The application of ANNs for paleontology is exemplified by study of Late Cretaceous belemnites. The Kohonen networks objectively subdivided the belemnite material] ~ 750 specimens) into consistent groups that could be treated as monospecific. The possibility of transferring these results to the language of classical statistics is also presented. Further development and possibility of use of ANNs in various areas of paleontology, paleobiology and paleoecology is briefly discussed.
15
Content available remote Biography of Józef Siemiradzki
EN
In this work, the biography of Józef Siemiradzki (1858-1933) has been documented by various archival materials, and accompanied by the list of his most important publications. Józef Siemiradzki was a Professor of Palaeontology at Jan Kazimierz University in Lvov, Member of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences, Honorary Member of the Polish Geological Institute, Commander of the Order of Polonia Restituta, Defender of Lvov, awarded the Cross of Valour. He co-operated with the Museum of the Physiographic Commission in Kraków and the Dzieduszycki Museum in Lvov. He was a representative of the National Department of the Galician Sejm in the expedition to Brazil in aim to support Polish emigrants. He wrote over 60 treatises, e.g. "Explanations to the Geological Map" - the first synthetic presentation of the geological structure of Polish lands, "Geology of Polish Lands" - the first monograph on the geological structure of Poland written in 20th century, and "Palaeozoology" - the first Polish textbook on palaeontology for academic use. In the field of palaeontology and stratigraphy he has been known as an author of the monograph on the Upper Jurassic ammonites from the Kraków Upland and the monograph on the genus Perisphinctes of Western Europe.
16
EN
The results of micropaleonthological studies of the Sarmatian (upper Miocene) Krakowiec Clays from primary deposit as well as re-deposited ones were applied to the analysis of the stratigraphic profile of the Sopot valley fills. The study site was at the break section of the Sopot River valley in a contact zone of southern escarpment between the central part of the Roztocze and Sandomierz Basin regions (SE Poland). Species of fossil microfauna (foraminiferans, radiolarians), sponges and mollusks, as well as residual deposits were used. The documented, even if apparently small change in the lithostatigraphic profile of the Sopot valley fills, i.e., the presence of pre-Pleistocene deposits in its floor, is very important for the valley history and for interpreting other problems of river breaks and the Roztocze escarpment zone itself, e.g., sclae of the Holocene movements elevating the Roztocze Region, and their effect on expected intensity of deep fluvial erosion. In the sub-scarp zone of the Tomaszów Roztocze subregion the Krakowiec Clays occur rather shallowly. In the Sopot valley (‘Czartowe Pole’landscape preserve) they are in contact with calcareous formations. In two levels of natural clays’exposures, a dozen or so foraminiferan taxa were found. They were also below the primary deposit on the floor levels of the Sopot valley fills. The residuum of the studied strata consists of glauconite and pre-Pleistocene quartz sands, without silicate and alumosilicate, typical for postglacial formations. The Sarmatian clays present in residue were redeposited at least in the pre-Pleistocene. From the clays top up to the surface of valley fills, are Holocene deposits. The study revealed that: (1) during the Holocene and earlier the Sopot valley fills were not removed completely; (2) the floor of the valley is made not of the youngest, Holocene strata, but much older; (3) the presence of the Sarmatian microfauna in the alluvia allows to date the studied deposits as pre-Pleistocene (Pliocene?); (4) fine quartz sands and glauconite (a specific form of hydromica) both forming the residuum of the studied valley fill levels, together with the absence of other silicates and alumosilicates that are common in the Pleistocene formations, exclude the studied Krakowiec Clays from the group of glacial or fluvioglacial (Pleistocene) formations; (5) the youngest (latest Pleistocene –Holocene) movements elevating the Roztocze Region and the resulting deep fluvial erosion do not correspond with shallow occurrence of the pre-Pleistocene valley fills; this requires further discussion.
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