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2015 | 60 | 1 |
Tytuł artykułu

Population dynamics of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) and long-tailed (M. longicaudus) and their relationship to downed wood in early successional forest habitats

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Języki publikacji
EN
Abstrakty
EN
Forest habitats after harvesting or wildfire disturbance are usually dominated by early successional vegetation for up to 5–10 years, as well as downed wood or coarse woody debris (CWD). Abundance of Microtus voles is often highest in these sites with sufficient plant cover being crucial for population increases. The role of CWD for voles is less clear. We tested the hypotheses (H) that (H1) abundance and reproduction of meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) and long-tailed vole (Microtus longicaudus) populations would be higher on sites with greater amounts of downed wood and that (H2) this relationship would be stronger on sites with sparse vegetation cover. There were two study areas: a dry Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)–lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forest and a high-elevation Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii)–subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forest in southern British Columbia, Canada. We monitored the responses of meadow voles and long-tailed voles to three levels of downed wood over a 4-year period in replicated clear-cut sites at each area. Amount of downed wood did not positively influence meadow or long-tailed vole population dynamics, and hence, H1 was not supported. Variability in meadow vole numbers and vegetation precluded a test of H2 for this microtine. In dry forests, abundance of meadow voles on clear-cuts was related to the availability of cover and vertical structure provided by herbs and grasses. Vegetation cover was sparse in the high-elevation clear-cuts and long-tailed voles did seem to be positively affected by the number of pieces of CWD, but not by volume, and hence H2 appeared to be partly supported. In high-elevation or otherwise slow-growing areas, and in areas with long-tailed voles, downed wood left after harvest may provide some cover and structure.
Słowa kluczowe
Wydawca
-
Czasopismo
Rocznik
Tom
60
Numer
1
Opis fizyczny
p.29-38,fig.,ref.
Twórcy
autor
  • Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
  • EcoLogic Research, 406 Hemlock Ave., Gabriola Island, BC V0R 1X1, Canada
autor
  • Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
  • Lands and Natural Resource Operations, British Columbia Ministry of Forests, 441 Columbia St., Kamloops, BC V2C 2T3, Canada
autor
  • Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
  • Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
Bibliografia
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  • Klenner W, Vyse A (1998) The Opax Mountain Silvicultural Systems Project: evaluating alternative approaches to managing dry Douglas-fir forests. In: Vyse A, Hollstedt C, Huggard D (eds) Proceedings of a workshop on managing the dry Douglas-fir forests of the southern interior, 29–30 April 1997, Kamloops BC. BC Ministry of Forests Research Branch Working Paper 34/1998, BC Min For, Victoria, BC pp 128–135
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