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http://yadda.icm.edu.pl:80/baztech/element/bwmeta1.element.baztech-97f93c4f-d29c-46a1-af79-e6918ab37b46

Czasopismo

Fibres & Textiles in Eastern Europe

Tytuł artykułu

Physicochemical and Mechanical Properties of Different Morphological Parts of the Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) Fibres

Autorzy Jammy, R.  Sahari, J. 
Treść / Zawartość
Warianty tytułu
PL Fizykochemiczne i mechaniczne właściwości różnych morfologicznie części drzewa herbacianego (Melaleuca alternifolia)
Języki publikacji EN
Abstrakty
EN Tea tree fibres as underutilised fibres were investigated physically, chemically and mechanically. From this study, it was found that the tea tree leaf (TTL) had the highest density - 0.42 g/cm3, and the highest percentage of water absorption - 69.9%. From the tensile strength, the tea tree trunk (TTT) gave the highest value - 65.44 MPa, followed by the tea tree branch (TTB) - 48.43 MPa and tea tree leaf (TTL) - 47.47 MPa. The chemical composition of fibres showed TTT had the highest cellulose content, which is 33.9%, followed by TTB -27.2%, and TTL - 13.5%. Meanwhile TTL had the highest extractive value - 16.4%, almost 3 times higher than TTB and TTT due to the existence of tea tree oil in TTL. From the FTIR result, TTL, TTB and TTT had similar spectra and no major differences. This paper aims to rationalise the potential of underutilised tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) waste as a novel source of natural fibre, to become a potential reinforcement or filler in the development of a new biocomposite.
PL Na podstawie badań stwierdzono, że liście drzewa herbacianego mają najwyższą gęstość 0.42 g/cm3 i najwyższą zawartość procentową absorpcji wody 69.9%. Badając wytrzymałość stwierdzono, że włókna z pnia drzewa herbacianego charakteryzują się najwyższą wytrzymałością 65.44 MPa, podczas gdy włókna z gałęzi mają wytrzymałość 48.43 MPa, a z liści 47.47 MPa. Badanie składu chemicznego wykazało, że włókna z pnia mają najwyższą zawartość celulozy 33.9%, podczas gdy z gałęzi 27.2% i liści 13.5%. Możliwość ekstrakcji jest największa dla liści 16.4%, prawie trzykrotnie wyższa niż dla gałęzi i pnia w wyniku zawartości w liściach olejku z drzewa herbacianego. Na podstawie badań FTIR stwierdzono, że poszczególne rodzaje morfologiczne włókien mają zbliżone rozkłady spektralne bez zasadniczych różnic. Głównym celem artykułu jest udowodnienie możliwości wykorzystania odpadów z drzewa herbacianego jako nowego źródła włókien naturalnych mogącego służyć jako potencjalne wzmocnienie lub wypełnienie przy opracowaniu nowych biokompozytów.
Słowa kluczowe
PL biokompozyty   wypełniacz   Melaleuca alternifolia   drzewo hebanowe   naturalny błonnik   zbrojenie  
EN biocomposite   filler   Melaleuca alternifolia   natural fibre   reinforcement  
Wydawca Instytut Biopolimerów i Włókien Chemicznych
Czasopismo Fibres & Textiles in Eastern Europe
Rocznik 2015
Tom Nr 6 (114)
Strony 31--36
Opis fizyczny Bibliogr. 37 poz., rys., tab.
Twórcy
autor Jammy, R.
  • Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
  • Knowledge and Technology Management Division, Sabah Economic Development & Investment Authority (SEDIA), Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
autor Sahari, J.
  • Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia Mohd Shah Mohd Kama Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, sahari@ums.edu.my
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Kolekcja BazTech
Identyfikator YADDA bwmeta1.element.baztech-97f93c4f-d29c-46a1-af79-e6918ab37b46
Identyfikatory
DOI 10.5604/12303666.1167414